Original Art

Browse my most recent original art work

Here is a sampling of some of my latest acrylic paintings from my most recent art show "Waterlust" featuring reefs, wrecks and caves. Email me directly at grace@gracemarquezstudio.com for info or purchasing details about any of the work below.


"Ice Tunnel"
Medium: Acrylic Paint on Canvas, 11"x14".
After a short 20 minute walk from where the drivable road ends, past small butterflies in the shade of the trees, past fields of grazing cows, you climb carefully through a barbed wire fence and walk down to the large basin and opening of El Toro Cave in the Dominican Republic. In this section of the cave, the bright white rock is so soft, the percolation from exhaled bubbles causes a snow-like effect and where the tiny pieces of rock come to rest, give the appearance of snow banks. It's magical. 
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"Cenote Cathedral"
Medium: Acrylic Paint with many layers of glaze on Canvas, 11"x14".
The light in a cavern zone is absolutely mesmerizing - especially when you're exiting from the darkness of the cave. The beams of light from the sun rippling in the water is one of those Mother Nature things that just makes you happy and grateful to be alive and experiencing such wonders. Some caves have big basins with wide open caverns like this one where you can explore in the light zone. Even within the light zone there can be some beautiful natural decorations of stalactites and stalagmites. 
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 "Turning the Dive"
Medium: Acrylic Paint with many layers of glaze on Canvas, 11"x14".
We do a lot of diving in the St. Lawrence river in Brockville and Rockport and also venture on the American side to dive the American wrecks including the Keystorm wreck. The Keystorm was a steel freighter was on her way from Ashlabula Ohio to Montreal loaded with coal. She struck a shoal in the fog near Alexandria Bay N.Y. and she sank stern first, rolled and came to rest on her starboard side in 115 feet of freshwater at the props. I’ve done a lot of training dives here or acted as tech support for training dives and love taking video of students here to break down and review their dives in the evening. 
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"Exploring the Deck of the Arabia"

Medium: Acrylic Paint with many layers of glaze on Canvas, 24"x30".
The popular wreck of the Arabia barque is one of those hallmark dives for divers new to Tobermory diving. I describe her to OW students as the pirate shipwreck of your imagination (minus the pirates). Located in Fathom Five Marine Park, it's a beautiful wreck where, the longer you look, the more lovely details you see in the structure. There are deadeyes still in place on the railings, a giant windlass, two anchors tied to the bow, her wheel that sits upright in the silt on the starboard side, masts laying on her deck and a the centre board down the middle of the deck. The more I dive these wrecks, the more I learn about ships!

Two divers barely visible but carrying their underwater torches as they swim next to a ship resting on her starboard side"On Her Starboard"
Medium: Acrylic Paint with many layers of glaze on Canvas, 24"x30".
While I usually dive with my dive buddies as a team, I do enjoy hanging back during a dive so that I can take in the whole scene. Divers give a sense of scale next to the wrecks. I can dive a wreck over and over again and each time she will reveal something new. Whether it's her details, covered in zebra mussels, or something in her structure or something about where she's come to rest. You just need to be fully present (and a little helium in your breathing gas doesn't hurt) to see what's new or what's different. Diving makes you appreciate being in the moment; learning and always growing in the moment.
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Two cave divers looking carefully a the shape and colours of an underwater cave"Divers underfoot- Traveling through the lifeblood of the earth"
Medium: Acrylic Paint on Canvas, 18"x24".
I LOVE rocks. When I started cave diving in 2013 it took my love of rocks to a whole other level since I am literally inside rocks while cave diving. It's absolutely magical seeing how Mother Nature has shaped the earth with water and with the elements. Cave diving has opened up a whole new level of curiosity and adventure for me. This painting is intended to show that the darkness of the cave is special in that a cave is only revealed by single beams of light from a diver's canister lights. The rest of the cave's shape is blanketed in darkness, keeping its secrets.
"Remnants of Conflict" - Wreck Diving the Fujikawa Maru"
Medium: Acrylic Paint on Canvas, 18"x24".
The wreck of the Fujikawa Maru was the first wreck I dove in Truk Lagoon and what was most memorable about it were the Zero planes located inside the second cargo hold. Zero planes were the infamous "kamikaze" planes flown by the Japanese in the battles of the Pacific during WW2. They were fast, maneuverable and could travel far distances. When one was captured by the Allied forces intact, it was sent to the US for study and newer planes were built to outclass them. Laden with weapons, they were intentionally flown into their Allied targets and destroyed on impact to  destructive effect. Diving has taught me so much history! 
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"Shoaling and Schooling"
Medium: Watercolour, pencil and acrylic on paper, 12x16 inches.

When they're moving together in the same direction, they're schooling. When they're staying together and socializing, they're shoaling. I didn't know there was a difference until I started diving. I typically learn about the things I see while diving. It just makes the experience more meaningful. One of the ways you know you're on point with your "hovering" (being motionless and hanging neutrally buoyant in the water) is when fish start to gather around you as if you're one of them. What a compliment! :)